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What is the percentage of Generl Aviation aircrafts we can see in SkyDemo .


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EHOW flyer
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frederic - 2/19/2019 8:21:33 PM
Tony, Markus, Mike,

Many thanks to all of you.

I am not sure that the workshop has connected my Garmin GPS to the Trig TT21 transponder. I suppose yes.
I will fly tomorrow and will take the opportunity to try to configure the transponder (GPS type, speed transfer..). I will be able to check it by displaying the ADS-B Monitor (see Tony's message).

About FR24, I understood that the signals were intercepted on the ground by a network of "private volunteers" with as main material the reading of ADS-B signals. Some of then are also equipped to receive the C / S transponder but are less numerous. 
I thought it was because of this reason that I do not always see my aircraft in FR24 but sometimes only short portions of my flights ... and always at the same places. But I am not an expert on FR24 and I can, of course, be wrong

Many thanks for your help.


You can easily check whether FR24 receives your position by ADS-B or has calculated it by multilateration.
Click on an aircraft symbol and the aircraft details will be displayed, at the bottom of this stack you will find:

where the position is received from the transponder itself, or:

where the position is not retrieved from the transponder, but by multilateration (MLAT) calculation.

The first ADS-B transponders were not able to transmit the position by 'extended squitter' (ES), many aircraft owners has changed their old transponder by a Garmin transponder without ES. In the same period, newcomers like TRIG, Garrecht or FUNKE where putting the first ADS-B wit ES on the European GA market. But almost no aircraft owner realizes the purpose of ES and neglected to connect the ES capable transponder to their (approved) GPS. Since years you can upgrade your 'old' Garmin transponder into a ES capable transponder. Many aircraft are ready to transmit their position, but it takes 2 wires between the GPS and ES capable transponder (and a sign...)


MarkusM
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EHOW flyer - 3/1/2019 10:03:35 AM
frederic - 2/19/2019 8:21:33 PM
Tony, Markus, Mike,

Many thanks to all of you.

I am not sure that the workshop has connected my Garmin GPS to the Trig TT21 transponder. I suppose yes.
I will fly tomorrow and will take the opportunity to try to configure the transponder (GPS type, speed transfer..). I will be able to check it by displaying the ADS-B Monitor (see Tony's message).

About FR24, I understood that the signals were intercepted on the ground by a network of "private volunteers" with as main material the reading of ADS-B signals. Some of then are also equipped to receive the C / S transponder but are less numerous. 
I thought it was because of this reason that I do not always see my aircraft in FR24 but sometimes only short portions of my flights ... and always at the same places. But I am not an expert on FR24 and I can, of course, be wrong

Many thanks for your help.


You can easily check whether FR24 receives your position by ADS-B or has calculated it by multilateration.
Click on an aircraft symbol and the aircraft details will be displayed, at the bottom of this stack you will find:

where the position is received from the transponder itself, or:

where the position is not retrieved from the transponder, but by multilateration (MLAT) calculation.

The first ADS-B transponders were not able to transmit the position by 'extended squitter' (ES), many aircraft owners has changed their old transponder by a Garmin transponder without ES. In the same period, newcomers like TRIG, Garrecht or FUNKE where putting the first ADS-B wit ES on the European GA market. But almost no aircraft owner realizes the purpose of ES and neglected to connect the ES capable transponder to their (approved) GPS. Since years you can upgrade your 'old' Garmin transponder into a ES capable transponder. Many aircraft are ready to transmit their position, but it takes 2 wires between the GPS and ES capable transponder (and a sign...)


I remember when I switched XPDR, these two wires were 10 cents in parts, 5,000 Euro to upgrade to WAAS GPS and 2,000 Euro for sole paperworks, so I stayed unconnected and non-WAAS. Btw, what happened to the initiative allowing certified non-WAAS GPS sources, silent death?

Edited 3/1/2019 10:45:20 AM by MarkusM
grahamb
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MarkusM - 3/1/2019 10:37:32 AM
EHOW flyer - 3/1/2019 10:03:35 AM
frederic - 2/19/2019 8:21:33 PM
Tony, Markus, Mike,

Many thanks to all of you.

I am not sure that the workshop has connected my Garmin GPS to the Trig TT21 transponder. I suppose yes.
I will fly tomorrow and will take the opportunity to try to configure the transponder (GPS type, speed transfer..). I will be able to check it by displaying the ADS-B Monitor (see Tony's message).

About FR24, I understood that the signals were intercepted on the ground by a network of "private volunteers" with as main material the reading of ADS-B signals. Some of then are also equipped to receive the C / S transponder but are less numerous. 
I thought it was because of this reason that I do not always see my aircraft in FR24 but sometimes only short portions of my flights ... and always at the same places. But I am not an expert on FR24 and I can, of course, be wrong

Many thanks for your help.


You can easily check whether FR24 receives your position by ADS-B or has calculated it by multilateration.
Click on an aircraft symbol and the aircraft details will be displayed, at the bottom of this stack you will find:

where the position is received from the transponder itself, or:

where the position is not retrieved from the transponder, but by multilateration (MLAT) calculation.

The first ADS-B transponders were not able to transmit the position by 'extended squitter' (ES), many aircraft owners has changed their old transponder by a Garmin transponder without ES. In the same period, newcomers like TRIG, Garrecht or FUNKE where putting the first ADS-B wit ES on the European GA market. But almost no aircraft owner realizes the purpose of ES and neglected to connect the ES capable transponder to their (approved) GPS. Since years you can upgrade your 'old' Garmin transponder into a ES capable transponder. Many aircraft are ready to transmit their position, but it takes 2 wires between the GPS and ES capable transponder (and a sign...)


I remember when I switched XPDR, these two wires were 10 cents in parts, 5,000 Euro to upgrade to WAAS GPS and 2,000 Euro for sole paperworks, so I stayed unconnected and non-WAAS. Btw, what happened to the initiative allowing certified non-WAAS GPS sources, silent death?

Attaching a non-certified position source to an ES transponder has been permitted for some time in the UK for non-EASA aircraft.

IN my (EASA) AA5 I've just had my GNS430W (legally Smile ) attached to my Trig TT31 for ADSB-out via the no-cost Trig STC and signed off under CS-STAN. The whole cost was peanuts (given I already had a GNS430W).

Edited 3/1/2019 2:37:57 PM by grahamb
MarkusM
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grahamb - 3/1/2019 2:36:07 PM
MarkusM - 3/1/2019 10:37:32 AM
EHOW flyer - 3/1/2019 10:03:35 AM
frederic - 2/19/2019 8:21:33 PM
Tony, Markus, Mike,

Many thanks to all of you.

I am not sure that the workshop has connected my Garmin GPS to the Trig TT21 transponder. I suppose yes.
I will fly tomorrow and will take the opportunity to try to configure the transponder (GPS type, speed transfer..). I will be able to check it by displaying the ADS-B Monitor (see Tony's message).

About FR24, I understood that the signals were intercepted on the ground by a network of "private volunteers" with as main material the reading of ADS-B signals. Some of then are also equipped to receive the C / S transponder but are less numerous. 
I thought it was because of this reason that I do not always see my aircraft in FR24 but sometimes only short portions of my flights ... and always at the same places. But I am not an expert on FR24 and I can, of course, be wrong

Many thanks for your help.


You can easily check whether FR24 receives your position by ADS-B or has calculated it by multilateration.
Click on an aircraft symbol and the aircraft details will be displayed, at the bottom of this stack you will find:

where the position is received from the transponder itself, or:

where the position is not retrieved from the transponder, but by multilateration (MLAT) calculation.

The first ADS-B transponders were not able to transmit the position by 'extended squitter' (ES), many aircraft owners has changed their old transponder by a Garmin transponder without ES. In the same period, newcomers like TRIG, Garrecht or FUNKE where putting the first ADS-B wit ES on the European GA market. But almost no aircraft owner realizes the purpose of ES and neglected to connect the ES capable transponder to their (approved) GPS. Since years you can upgrade your 'old' Garmin transponder into a ES capable transponder. Many aircraft are ready to transmit their position, but it takes 2 wires between the GPS and ES capable transponder (and a sign...)


I remember when I switched XPDR, these two wires were 10 cents in parts, 5,000 Euro to upgrade to WAAS GPS and 2,000 Euro for sole paperworks, so I stayed unconnected and non-WAAS. Btw, what happened to the initiative allowing certified non-WAAS GPS sources, silent death?

Attaching a non-certified position source to an ES transponder has been permitted for some time in the UK for non-EASA aircraft.

IN my (EASA) AA5 I've just had my GNS430W (legally Smile ) attached to my Trig TT31 for ADSB-out via the no-cost Trig STC and signed off under CS-STAN. The whole cost was peanuts (given I already had a GNS430W).

Upgrading to WAAS for the sole reason of ADS-B out just seemed over the top to me. I know of the UK special way of uncertified sources, but also know of the several complaints of airliner pilots, disabling the annunciation of these targets = no real use for that. I wonder what will happen to this UK speciality after Brexit.

grahamb
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MarkusM - 3/8/2019 9:52:56 AM
grahamb - 3/1/2019 2:36:07 PM
MarkusM - 3/1/2019 10:37:32 AM
EHOW flyer - 3/1/2019 10:03:35 AM
frederic - 2/19/2019 8:21:33 PM
Tony, Markus, Mike,

Many thanks to all of you.

I am not sure that the workshop has connected my Garmin GPS to the Trig TT21 transponder. I suppose yes.
I will fly tomorrow and will take the opportunity to try to configure the transponder (GPS type, speed transfer..). I will be able to check it by displaying the ADS-B Monitor (see Tony's message).

About FR24, I understood that the signals were intercepted on the ground by a network of "private volunteers" with as main material the reading of ADS-B signals. Some of then are also equipped to receive the C / S transponder but are less numerous. 
I thought it was because of this reason that I do not always see my aircraft in FR24 but sometimes only short portions of my flights ... and always at the same places. But I am not an expert on FR24 and I can, of course, be wrong

Many thanks for your help.


You can easily check whether FR24 receives your position by ADS-B or has calculated it by multilateration.
Click on an aircraft symbol and the aircraft details will be displayed, at the bottom of this stack you will find:

where the position is received from the transponder itself, or:

where the position is not retrieved from the transponder, but by multilateration (MLAT) calculation.

The first ADS-B transponders were not able to transmit the position by 'extended squitter' (ES), many aircraft owners has changed their old transponder by a Garmin transponder without ES. In the same period, newcomers like TRIG, Garrecht or FUNKE where putting the first ADS-B wit ES on the European GA market. But almost no aircraft owner realizes the purpose of ES and neglected to connect the ES capable transponder to their (approved) GPS. Since years you can upgrade your 'old' Garmin transponder into a ES capable transponder. Many aircraft are ready to transmit their position, but it takes 2 wires between the GPS and ES capable transponder (and a sign...)


I remember when I switched XPDR, these two wires were 10 cents in parts, 5,000 Euro to upgrade to WAAS GPS and 2,000 Euro for sole paperworks, so I stayed unconnected and non-WAAS. Btw, what happened to the initiative allowing certified non-WAAS GPS sources, silent death?

Attaching a non-certified position source to an ES transponder has been permitted for some time in the UK for non-EASA aircraft.

IN my (EASA) AA5 I've just had my GNS430W (legally Smile ) attached to my Trig TT31 for ADSB-out via the no-cost Trig STC and signed off under CS-STAN. The whole cost was peanuts (given I already had a GNS430W).

Upgrading to WAAS for the sole reason of ADS-B out just seemed over the top to me. I know of the UK special way of uncertified sources, but also know of the several complaints of airliner pilots, disabling the annunciation of these targets = no real use for that. I wonder what will happen to this UK speciality after Brexit.

It won't just be a 'UK special' way after a month or so, as EASA have just announced that the revised CS-STAN for ADS-B via a Mode S will be issued imminently. It allows three flavours - with certified position source, with a TABS device, and with a non-certified source. It defines the SIL and SDA values to be used in each case. That's also the your answer to your final question, whatever happens as a consequence of Brexit, as far as EASA types are concerned. For UK regulated non-EASA types, I assume the status quo will continue.



MarkusM
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grahamb - 3/8/2019 2:12:03 PM
MarkusM - 3/8/2019 9:52:56 AM
grahamb - 3/1/2019 2:36:07 PM
MarkusM - 3/1/2019 10:37:32 AM
EHOW flyer - 3/1/2019 10:03:35 AM
frederic - 2/19/2019 8:21:33 PM
Tony, Markus, Mike,

Many thanks to all of you.

I am not sure that the workshop has connected my Garmin GPS to the Trig TT21 transponder. I suppose yes.
I will fly tomorrow and will take the opportunity to try to configure the transponder (GPS type, speed transfer..). I will be able to check it by displaying the ADS-B Monitor (see Tony's message).

About FR24, I understood that the signals were intercepted on the ground by a network of "private volunteers" with as main material the reading of ADS-B signals. Some of then are also equipped to receive the C / S transponder but are less numerous. 
I thought it was because of this reason that I do not always see my aircraft in FR24 but sometimes only short portions of my flights ... and always at the same places. But I am not an expert on FR24 and I can, of course, be wrong

Many thanks for your help.


You can easily check whether FR24 receives your position by ADS-B or has calculated it by multilateration.
Click on an aircraft symbol and the aircraft details will be displayed, at the bottom of this stack you will find:

where the position is received from the transponder itself, or:

where the position is not retrieved from the transponder, but by multilateration (MLAT) calculation.

The first ADS-B transponders were not able to transmit the position by 'extended squitter' (ES), many aircraft owners has changed their old transponder by a Garmin transponder without ES. In the same period, newcomers like TRIG, Garrecht or FUNKE where putting the first ADS-B wit ES on the European GA market. But almost no aircraft owner realizes the purpose of ES and neglected to connect the ES capable transponder to their (approved) GPS. Since years you can upgrade your 'old' Garmin transponder into a ES capable transponder. Many aircraft are ready to transmit their position, but it takes 2 wires between the GPS and ES capable transponder (and a sign...)


I remember when I switched XPDR, these two wires were 10 cents in parts, 5,000 Euro to upgrade to WAAS GPS and 2,000 Euro for sole paperworks, so I stayed unconnected and non-WAAS. Btw, what happened to the initiative allowing certified non-WAAS GPS sources, silent death?

Attaching a non-certified position source to an ES transponder has been permitted for some time in the UK for non-EASA aircraft.

IN my (EASA) AA5 I've just had my GNS430W (legally Smile ) attached to my Trig TT31 for ADSB-out via the no-cost Trig STC and signed off under CS-STAN. The whole cost was peanuts (given I already had a GNS430W).

Upgrading to WAAS for the sole reason of ADS-B out just seemed over the top to me. I know of the UK special way of uncertified sources, but also know of the several complaints of airliner pilots, disabling the annunciation of these targets = no real use for that. I wonder what will happen to this UK speciality after Brexit.

It won't just be a 'UK special' way after a month or so, as EASA have just announced that the revised CS-STAN for ADS-B via a Mode S will be issued imminently. It allows three flavours - with certified position source, with a TABS device, and with a non-certified source. It defines the SIL and SDA values to be used in each case. That's also the your answer to your final question, whatever happens as a consequence of Brexit, as far as EASA types are concerned. For UK regulated non-EASA types, I assume the status quo will continue.



Thanks for pointing to the upcoming Amendment 3 to CS-STAN, I did miss that one. Looks like they are finally going to legalize the non-certified GNSS source, which is fine. So I may plan to do the wire soon.

frederic
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Thank you to all of you.

I am not transponding A-DSB. The famous 2 wires are not connected. We will do that at the next time the airplane will go to the worshop.
I think I will buy a PilotAware. For the costs, I find it interesting. So I will no more be part of the problem.

TimT
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Tim Dawson - 2/18/2019 10:31:05 AM
The SkyEcho 2 doesn't currently implement bearingless targets as we all know them from FLARM and PilotAware.

I understood the challenge of representing bearingless targets on a map screen. However, as many users have pointed out (on your FB page) at this stage the thread is equally from bearingless targets as it may be from proper ADS-B equipped targets.

I think your latest wonderful feature of spoken near-by traffic alerts could allow you to re-consider your position. It is easy to imagine how to include bearingless targets in a meaningful way in the spoken output, even if not displayed on the map. 

(Users may opt to display bearingless targets on the screen only as "warning banners", while proper targets are depicted a aircraft symbols on the map...)

Edited 3/30/2019 9:16:30 AM by TimT
Tim Dawson
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I can think of no faster way of ruining our verbal traffic information feature than making it read out all the bearingless targets in the area.

It is a well-accepted tenet of human interface guidelines that when you start telling users too much information, many will find it annoying and mentally tune it out, or worse, disable the feature altogether as being something that just gives useless information.

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frederic
See my posts above. Decided about a month ago to purchase PilotAware ‘Rosetta’ as this device can see more aircraft than any other piece of kit. There are already a surprising number of aircraft with a GPS position indicated and of course this will inevitably increase.
So why not get yourself PW and see what is out there, I am upgrading my transponder to ‘ADS-B’ out so then you will see me if we cross tracks. REMEMBER always for VFR flying the mark 1 eyeball system is the premier look out device.
Phil
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