Important: These forums are for discussions between SkyDemon users. They are not routinely monitored by SkyDemon staff so any urgent issues should be sent directly to our Customer Support.

VFR Cruising Level (ENR 7.1-3) during planning


Author
Message
Frank Pico
Frank Pico
Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 5, Visits: 25
Hello,
I am trying to find a feature within Skydemon, but can't find it. I understand that it is not available.

Let me explain, as per the "Warnings" tab, it would be good that a route plan by warned if not within the VFR Cruising Level (ENR 7.1-3). I understand that each country has different rules. But this would be a great feature.

Thanks in advance,
Frank.
www.funflyingwithfrank.com

Tim Dawson
Tim Dawson
SkyDemon Team (494K reputation)SkyDemon Team (494K reputation)SkyDemon Team (494K reputation)SkyDemon Team (494K reputation)SkyDemon Team (494K reputation)SkyDemon Team (494K reputation)SkyDemon Team (494K reputation)SkyDemon Team (494K reputation)SkyDemon Team (494K reputation)
Group: Moderators
Posts: 6K, Visits: 4.6K
What is a "VFR cruising level"?
Frank Pico
Frank Pico
Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 5, Visits: 25
Tim Dawson - 2/20/2019 11:11:56 AM
What is a "VFR cruising level"?


There are specific VFR cruising altitudes/levels, based on the aircraft's course, to assist pilots in separating their aircraft while operating under visual flight above 3,000 ft above the surface (AGL) but below 18,000 ft Mean Sea Level (MSL).
Example:
  On a magnetic course of 0-179 degrees shall fly at an odd thousand ft MSL altitude +500 feet (e.g., 3,500, 5,500, or 7,500 ft); or
  On a magnetic course of 180-359 degrees shall fly at an even thousand ft MSL altitude +500 feet (e.g., 4,500, 6,500, or 8,500 ft).
This is usually published in the AIP (ENR).

Regards,


grahamb
grahamb
Too Much Forum (1.9K reputation)Too Much Forum (1.9K reputation)Too Much Forum (1.9K reputation)Too Much Forum (1.9K reputation)Too Much Forum (1.9K reputation)Too Much Forum (1.9K reputation)Too Much Forum (1.9K reputation)Too Much Forum (1.9K reputation)Too Much Forum (1.9K reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 73, Visits: 2.2K
Frank Pico - 2/20/2019 3:12:07 PM
Tim Dawson - 2/20/2019 11:11:56 AM
What is a "VFR cruising level"?


There are specific VFR cruising altitudes/levels, based on the aircraft's course, to assist pilots in separating their aircraft while operating under visual flight above 3,000 ft above the surface (AGL) but below 18,000 ft Mean Sea Level (MSL).
Example:
  On a magnetic course of 0-179 degrees shall fly at an odd thousand ft MSL altitude +500 feet (e.g., 3,500, 5,500, or 7,500 ft); or
  On a magnetic course of 180-359 degrees shall fly at an even thousand ft MSL altitude +500 feet (e.g., 4,500, 6,500, or 8,500 ft).
This is usually published in the AIP (ENR).

Regards,


It's actually more complex than that. Below the Transition Altitude, the cruising levels are expressed as altitudes; above it the levels are expressed as flight levels. This is fine and dandy when you have a single TA at 18,000' amsl as in your example, but in the UK we are years away from that, and the TA can vary from 3000' amsl to 6000' amsl over the space of a few miles. 

If you want SD to warn a user, it has to be a meaningful, accurate warning. What you are asking for would be difficult, if not impossible, to implement completely and correctly in the UK, and would make SD much more complex to use than it needs to be. 

 

Edited 2/20/2019 4:35:55 PM by grahamb
MarkusM
M
Too Much Forum (85 reputation)Too Much Forum (85 reputation)Too Much Forum (85 reputation)Too Much Forum (85 reputation)Too Much Forum (85 reputation)Too Much Forum (85 reputation)Too Much Forum (85 reputation)Too Much Forum (85 reputation)Too Much Forum (85 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 58, Visits: 55
That would be a bigger effort to sort out. Although there is a generic semi-circular rule we are familiar in some central european countries, different countries use different transition altitudes or even transition density altitudes or heights, some on QNH and some on QFE. Even further, some countries use different transition altitudes for regional traffic and transiting traffic. Even more further, some countries don't use semi-circular, but quadrants-rules or in extreme octuples-rules. Good luck to collect and maintain all this.
Edited 2/20/2019 4:23:42 PM by MarkusM
Frank Pico
Frank Pico
Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)Forum Newbie (7 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 5, Visits: 25
Thanks for the replies.

As a note, I was not thinking of warnings during flight, but during planning, for example as with terrain level warnings on the warning tab, where a pop is shown to correct the minimum safe altitude.

Example:
Your leg from XXX to YYY is planned at 2,100ft, which is below its minimum safe altitude of 3,500ft.
Would you like to raise the cruise level for this leg to 3,500 ft ?

Thank you again.

GO

Merge Selected

Merge into selected topic...



Merge into merge target...



Merge into a specific topic ID...




Reading This Topic

Login

Explore
Messages
Mentions
Search